American Heart Association

Expanding telestroke access personal for stroke survivor

By AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION NEWS

Roger Keller will be among the more than 20 stroke advocates from around the country who will flock to Washington, D.C., on March 1 to talk with lawmakers about expanded access to telestroke for people on Medicare.

The 54-year-old “can’t put into words” how vital telestroke […]

Clot buster treatment safe, effective for patients who required living assistance pre-stroke

By AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION NEWS

People who require daily living assistance are often excluded from clinical trials with intravenous thrombolysis, or IVT – clot-busting drugs given through an I.V. line to people experiencing an acute ischemic stroke. Because of a lack of information about this population, if they have a stroke, they may not […]

Poor sleep in seniors linked to hardened brain arteries

By AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION NEWS

Poor sleep quality in elderly persons is associated with more severe arteriosclerosis in the brain as well as a greater burden of oxygen-starved tissue (infarcts) in the brain – both of which can contribute to the risk of stroke and cognitive impairment. The findings are […]

Young man’s life changes course after stroke

By AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION NEWS

At 23, Brent Wylie was a recent college graduate working in real estate investment and making plans for law school.

On a Friday night in August 2011, he was on his way to meet up with friends at an Atlanta nightclub, talking on the phone with […]

January 14th, 2016|Categories: Stories from the Heart, Stroke|Tags: , |0 Comments

First Global NCD Alliance Forum highlighted patients, advocacy and accountability

BY AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION NEWS

Michelle Ballasiotes became a stroke survivor before she was born.

When she was still in-utero, it was discovered that she most likely would have hydrocephalus, a build-up of cerebrospinal fluid in the brain.

Her brain surgery at just 3 days old revealed she had suffered a hemorrhagic […]

Stent retrievers revolutionize treatment for severe strokes

BY AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION NEWS

Editor’s note: This is one in a 10-part series of the top medical research advances as determined by American Heart Association volunteer and staff leaders.

How the most disabling strokes are treated is undergoing the biggest transformation in decades after research this year showed dramatic benefits […]

Stroke survivor’s recovery a ‘Christmas miracle of awesomeness’

BY AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION NEWS

Wade Abbott chokes up when he thinks about last Christmas.

“The best Christmas present I’d ever gotten was bringing my wife home from the hospital,” he said.

At 3:30 a.m. on December 21, Ellen Abbott got up to go to her weekly early morning shift at Target […]

December 11th, 2015|Categories: Stories from the Heart, Stroke|Tags: , |4 Comments

Native-American activist learns to put self first after stroke

BY AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION NEWS

Sheryl Gann spent her life as a grassroots activist, fighting for issues close to Osage tribe community. But after surviving a stroke at age 46, the Native American woman realized she had to learn to let go.

On May 11, 2015, Gann had just gotten to […]

Lowering body temperature increases survival of some cardiac arrest patients

BY AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION NEWS

DALLAS — Lowering the body’s temperature of cardiac arrest patients with “non-shockable” heart rhythms increases survival rates and brain function, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

“Therapeutic hypothermia” is a medical treatment that intentionally lowers the body’s temperature to protect it […]

AHA president saw peripheral artery disease firsthand

BY AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION NEWS

Like many people of his generation, Nathaniel Creager spent the prime years of his life with a constant companion: cigarettes.

He fired through three packs of unfiltered Chesterfields daily for about 30 years. Later in life, after he’d finally quit, his legs hurt when he walked […]