Information and opinions presented here do not always represent the views of the American Heart Association.

All posts tagged depression

Stress and stroke blog photo

High stress, hostility, depression may up stroke risk

Having a lot of stress, hostility and depression was associated with a significantly higher risk of stroke or transient ischemic attack in middle-aged and older adults, according to new research. A TIA is a stroke caused by a temporary blockage …

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depression

Depression may be a hidden heart disease risk factor for women under 55

Women 55 and younger who are depressed are twice as likely to have a heart attack, die or require artery-opening procedures, according to new research. “Women in this age

April 22 Snowy Mycle

Four-time stroke survivor makes trek across the country for the fourth time

He's at it again. Four-time stroke survivor Mycle Brandy, 63, has his walking shoes on and he is making his way from Portland, Oregon, to Portland, Maine. This is

mexican-american_after-stroke

Stroke patients should receive customized palliative care

People recovering from a stroke should have a well-coordinated medical team to personalize care, optimize quality of life and minimize suffering, according to a scientific statement published Monday

stress

Anxiety linked to higher long-term risk of stroke

The greater the anxiety level, the higher risk of having a stroke, according to new research published in the American Heart Association journal Stroke. The study is the first in

Stroke Connection Fall image

Stroke Connection highlights progress in post-stroke treatments

 The fall edition of  Stroke Connection, a free, quarterly magazine published by the American Stroke Association, offers a look at treatment advances for post-stroke depression and a condition that causes involuntary

Simple Science

Simple Science@Heart: Psychosocial distress may increase risk of stroke in seniors

Seniors dealing with depression, stress, a negative outlook and dissatisfaction with life may face a higher risk of stroke. That grumpy outlook could be psychosocial distress, and researchers have