Information and opinions presented here do not always represent the views of the American Heart Association.

All posts tagged Brigham and Women’s Hospital

Salt Shaker

Too much sodium in the diet could make multiple sclerosis worse

Eating too much sodium could make multiple sclerosis symptoms worse and increase the risk of further damage, according to a small study published in the Journal of Neurology Neurosurgery & Psychiatry. “This is an intriguing, preliminary observation that suggests a high …

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Blood Pressure Check

Blacks, women face greater burden from CVD risk factors

The impact of major cardiovascular risk factors combined is greater in women than men and in blacks than whites. While the gender gap may be narrowing, differences by

GWTG stock

More than 5 million treated through Get With The Guidelines

More than 5 million people have received heart and stroke care based on the latest research-based treatment guidelines, thanks to an American Heart Association/American Stroke Association program that

poverty

PAD risk increases with lower economic status

Low income and lower education levels are associated with an increased risk for peripheral artery disease in U.S. adults, according to a new study in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality

Elliott Antman, M.D.

Early discovery led Antman to cardiology research, AHA; now he’s the organization’s president

In his third year of medical school, Elliott Antman thought he would become a neurosurgeon. He wasn’t set on it, though, and kept searching for something that might

nutrition-panel

Government to issue guidelines for lowering sodium in foods

Food manufacturers and restaurants -- suppliers of three-fourths of the sodium in Americans’ diets -- may soon be asked by the government to lower sodium in their foods. The

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New Health eHeart Study actively recruits participants

The Health eHeart Study, an internet-based clinical research study from the University of California, San Francisco, is actively recruiting participants interested in helping investigators better understand cardiovascular disease. The